Tag Archives: Community Development Program

Media Release: CDP participants bring Ngukurr community closer to vital water upgrade

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SKILLS ON SHOW: After completing heavy vehicle training through Roper Gulf Regional Council’s Community Development Programme, Ngukurr resident Gene Daniels hoses down a sand pile as part of his new role as a water truck driver on the project delivering an upgraded water bore for his remote community.

SKILLS ON SHOW: After completing heavy vehicle training through Roper Gulf Regional Council’s Community Development Programme, Ngukurr resident Gene Daniels hoses down a sand pile as part of his new role as a water truck driver on the project delivering an upgraded water bore for his remote community.

Minister for Indigenous Affairs Nigel Scullion has today congratulated Roper Gulf Regional Council on its latest Community Development Programme (CDP) success.

The Council has worked with a Northern Territory-based earthmoving company to provide opportunities for CDP participants in Ngukurr to play an important role in delivering a much-needed water infrastructure upgrade for their community.

“Getting job seekers into real employment is a key component of the CDP,” Minister Scullion said.

“Jobs such as these are a great outcome to meet the needs of remote Australia so people can move from welfare to work, and make a contribution back to their community.”

With a multitude of construction projects in progress and scheduled in the vicinity of the remote Indigenous community, located approximately 640 kilometres south-east of Darwin, over the next few years, the Council has sourced training that will equip participants with the accreditation and confidence needed to secure employment opportunities as they arise.

Roper Gulf Regional Council has been working with participants to develop activities and training that produce job-ready participants, the most recent of which has allowed Gene Daniels and John Herbert to gain employment driving water trucks the day after completing a heavy rigid vehicle course in the Northern Territory capital.

Gene Daniels, Karla Daly, Neil Body, Hilroy Manggurra and Tristen Charlie are all smiles as they prepare to continue laying the pipeline for Ngukurr's new water bore.

Gene Daniels, Karla Daly, Neil Body, Hilroy Manggurra and Tristen Charlie are all smiles as they prepare to continue laying the pipeline for Ngukurr’s new water bore.

The pair is now carting water for NV Barrett Earthmoving as the Power and Water Corporation contractor lays a 6.2-kilometre pipeline that will connect Ngukurr to its new water supply.

In a bonus for Ngukurr’s CDP ranks, participants Hilroy Manggurra and Tristen Charlie have also been employed as labourers on the vital project to improve water accessibility.

Mr Daniels said he had learnt a lot from the training and was looking forward to securing additional work driving trucks on a more permanent basis.

“Getting this job is good for me and good for Ngukurr, because we are helping put the new bore in,” the 32-year-old explained.

“I’ll be able to drive a water cart on other jobs after this, so I’m very proud.”

NV Barrett Earthmoving Project Manager Neil Boyd congratulated the men on their work ethic in testing conditions and said they had slotted into the team seamlessly.

“Considering the temperature out here, they are doing a wonderful job,” he said.

He added that the Council’s approach was helping to develop a network of skilled workers in communities across its 186,000-square kilometre Local Government Area.

“We come and go from community being Power and Water contractors, so it’s important for us to know these guys are here, that they can do the job and that they are able to come straight out onto site skilled up for future work.”

Gene Daniels cuts a lone figure in his water truck as he drives along the 6.2-kilometre pipeline being installed by Power and Water Corporation contractor NV Barrett Earthmoving.

Gene Daniels cuts a lone figure in his water truck as he drives along the 6.2-kilometre pipeline being installed by Power and Water Corporation contractor NV Barrett Earthmoving.

Mayor Judy MacFarlane praised Ngukurr CDP Senior Employment Consultant Victoria Haig for facilitating the partnership between the participants and their new employer.

“This is just a fantastic outcome for these four men and Ngukurr in general,” she said.

“Our CDP staff across the Roper Gulf region are committed to providing training that allows for real upskilling and employment opportunities, and seeing the pride the men have in themselves and their community proves Council is leading the way in CDP delivery in some of the remotest parts of the NT.”

The Council runs CDP projects in its Local Government Area on behalf of the Commonwealth Government.

The Commonwealth Government initiative assists jobseekers in remote communities to find employment as they contribute to their communities and gain new skills in the
process.

View the full Media Release here.

Media Release: Ngukurr students saddle up to celebrate equine infrastructure unveiling

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EQUINE EXCELLENCE: Students, CDP participants and staff celebrate the official opening of the Ngukurr School equestrian yards on September 7 after a collaboration between the school and Roper Gulf Regional Council delivered the much-needed infrastructure.

EQUINE EXCELLENCE: Students, Community Development Program participants and staff celebrate the official opening of the Ngukurr School equestrian yards on September 7 after a collaboration between the school and Roper Gulf Regional Council delivered the much-needed infrastructure.

After stepping out of the saddle at the completion of their education, a group of men in Ngukurr have gone back to school to ensure future generations of students in the remote community have access to the infrastructure needed to advance their horsemanship skills.

Through its Community Development Program (CDP), Roper Gulf Regional Council has partnered with the Ngukurr School to construct a set of steel yards that will used by the 16 Year 9 to Year 12 students who learn about riding and equine management when they are not in the classroom.

The school supplied the materials for the ambitious build, with CDP participants providing the labour as they developed a new range of skills in metalwork, construction and project management under the watchful eye of the Council’s CDP Builder Trainer.

Witnessing the yards take shape had special meaning for several of the participants involved in the project who have a first-hand understanding of how important the horsemanship program is for fostering confidence and self-esteem in students.

Roper Gulf Regional Council CDP participant Donald Hall tells CDP Regional Manager Janelle Iszlaub what helping to build the yards means to him as a former student of the Ngukurr School horsemanship program.

Roper Gulf Regional Council CDP participant Donald Hall tells CDP Regional Manager Janelle Iszlaub what helping to build the yards means to him as a former student of the Ngukurr School horsemanship program.

Participant Donald Hall explained that as a former student in the program, he had jumped at the chance to give something back to the school.

“It makes me feel proud to have been in the horse program when I was at school, and now doing something to help the horse program,” he said.

CDP Regional Manager Janelle Iszlaub said she was thrilled to see how committed participants had been to growing their skillsets as part of a project.

“Council has had anywhere from 12 to 20 CDP participants at a time working on this project, and they have put countless hours into finishing it and making sure it is something Ngukurr can be extremely proud of,” she said.

After putting the finishing touches on the fabrication project, CDP participants watch Ngukurr School students try out their new horse yards.

After putting the finishing touches on the fabrication project, CDP participants watch Ngukurr School students try out their new horse yards.

“This was about showing the kids what the participants can do, which has been community involvement and teamwork, welding, machine operation, and preparing and managing the job from initial conception.”

The Council runs CDP projects in its Local Government Area on behalf of the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet.

The Federal Government initiative assists jobseekers in remote communities to find  employment as they contribute to their communities and gain new skills in the process.

View the full Media Release here.

Media Release: Binjari books reinforce Indigenous languages matter

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NEW CHAPTER: Through Roper Gulf Regional Council’s Community Development Program, Binjari resident Marilyn Firth has created a book in Kriol called Fishing – lenimbat ola biginini, which will teach children about fishing in the Indigenous language.

NEW CHAPTER: Through Roper Gulf Regional Council’s Community Development Program, Binjari resident Marilyn Firth has created a book in Kriol called Fishing – lenimbat ola biginini, which will teach children about fishing in the Indigenous language.

With many traditional dialects languishing across Australia, the NAIDOC Week 2017 theme of “Our Languages Matter” is being lived in the community of Binjari as part of a Roper Gulf Regional Council Community Development Program (CDP) project sharing Kriol with the next generation.

For the past two years, female CDP participants have been training to use the Kriol spelling system with Australian National University linguist Denise Angelo, and their determined efforts have paid off with the announcement that nine of the children’s books they have written will be distributed through the Indigenous Literacy Foundation (ILF).

In June, the ILF supported artist and illustrator Julie Haysom to visit the community, about 15 kilometres west of Katherine, and work with the women to create three board books, three picture books and three chapter books.

The six aspiring authors had additional creative support from fellow participants Karen Manbulloo, Halrisha Hodgson, Daniella Carlton, Natasha Waterloo, Tasiana Douglas, Sylvia Birdum, Rozelle Frith, Sarah Lewis and Marisa Smiler-Cairns, who provided paintings and sketches to illustrate the books.

Binjari CDP participants Bernadine Booth and Sylvia Birdum inspect the progress of their books with artist and illustrator Julie Haysom.

Binjari CDP participants Bernadine Booth and Sylvia Birdum inspect the progress of their books with artist and illustrator Julie Haysom.

Chief Executive Officer Michael Berto said the project had allowed the CDP participants to develop self-confidence through literacy, adding that he was thrilled to see the final drafts of the books.

“The women speak Kriol mostly as a first language, but like the majority of Kriol speakers, they did not learn to read and write the language at school,” he explained.

“This project has provided an introduction to the way Kriol is written, and the ladies’ confidence with written Kriol has increased as the books took shape.

“I’m extremely proud of what they have achieved, because it is helping to build capacity for their community, and that’s exactly what the Community Development Program is designed to do.”

The books are:

Board books

  • Olkainawan kalawan loli (Lollies of All Different Colours) by Milly Raymond
  • Yakai! Beibigel! (Baby Girl! Stop!) by Maureen Hodgson
  • Ola kala en namba (Colours and Numbers) by Bernadine Booth

Picture books

  • Moli det bigibigi (Molly the Pig) by Karen Manbulloo
  • Tudei en longtaim (Now and Then) by Stella Raymond
  • Fishing – lenimbat ola biginini (Fishing Know-How – Teaching Children) by Marilyn Frith

Chapter books

  • Roki det kenggurru (Rocky the Kangaroo) by Maureen Hodgson
  • Hanting gada biliken (Hunting with Billycans) by Maureen Hodgson
  • Hanting gada trekta en treila (Hunting with a Tractor and Trailer) by Maureen Hodgson
Daniella Carlton and Natasha Waterloo are just two of the Binjari illustrators whose work will be published in nine children’s books by the Indigenous Literacy Foundation.

Daniella Carlton and Natasha Waterloo are just two of the Binjari illustrators whose work will be published in nine children’s books by the Indigenous Literacy Foundation.

Once the books have been published, ILF will distribute copies to CDP participants and other community members in Binjari, as well as to schools, childcare centres and health services across the Katherine region.

The Council runs CDP projects in its Local Government Area on behalf of the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet.

The Federal Government initiative assists jobseekers in remote communities to find employment as they contribute to their communities and gain new skills in the process.

View the full Media Release here.

Game of Thrones gives Binjari CDP project cutting edge

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DEADLY DIRECTION: Binjari Community Development Project participant Ashley Farrell, seated, proudly shows off this Game of Thrones-inspired pallet chair as he is congratulated by fellow participants on.

DEADLY DIRECTION: Binjari Community Development Project participant Ashley Farrell, seated, proudly shows off this Game of Thrones-inspired pallet chair as he is congratulated by fellow participants.

The cult television series Game of Thrones has influenced creativity in every corner of the globe, and now an Indigenous community near Katherine can be added to the list.

After watching the hit program, Roper Gulf Regional Council Community Development Program (CDP) participant Ashley Farrell decided to take the sword to his latest project, literally.

CDP participants in Binjari, 15 kilometres south-west of Katherine, have been using recycled pallets to create a range of chairs over the past few months and have turned heads with previous designs, which included one modelled on the famous throne in the Phantom’s Skull Cave.

Wanting to set a new bar for ingenuity, Mr Farrell carved a range of knives, swords and daggers out of leftover material to adorn his chair with.

The 23-year-old said he “winged it” when asked about planning the stunning design.

“I’ve done chairs before, but I wanted to do something with knives, because I like Game of Thrones,” he explained.

“I didn’t have a design in mind when I started building it – I just winged it.”

The plan is now to have the head-turning chair displayed in a Katherine art gallery.

The Council’s Acting CDP Regional Manager, Barbara Maddern, said she was continually surprised by what participants came up with.

“It’s absolutely amazing,” she said.

“These men have such creative and artistic minds, and it’s fantastic to see them able to put that ability into incredible furniture.

“I’m so proud of what participants in our communities have been able to achieve as part of pallet furniture projects.”

The Council delivers CDP projects in 10 communities on behalf of the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet.

The Federal Government initiative assists jobseekers in remote communities to find employment as they contribute to their communities and gain new skills in the process.

For further information, please contact the Communications Coordinator on 0427 674 212 or at roper.governance@ropergulf.nt.gov.au.

 

 

 

 

Media Release: Beswick oasis offers unexpected backyard bounty

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BESWICK BOUNTY: Robert Rickson, Ray Ashley and Shay Ladd tend to the pumpkins that have been planted in Roper Gulf Regional Council’s Beswick Nursery as part of a Community Development Program project.

BESWICK BOUNTY: Robert Rickson, Ray Ashley and Shay Ladd tend to the pumpkins that have been planted in Roper Gulf Regional Council’s Beswick Nursery as part of a Community Development Program project.

It is an inviting oasis that contrasts the surrounding ochre landscape and provides skill development and a bountiful, backyard source of fresh produce to the residents of Beswick.

What started as a Roper Gulf Regional Council Community Development Program project has quickly evolved into a source of pride in the community, which is about 110 kilometres east of Katherine, as participants nurture and cultivate a diverse range of fruit and vegetables for their friends and families to enjoy.

CDP participant Ray Ashley said he enjoyed the challenge presented by growing produce one would not usually find in Beswick.

“It’s good looking after the garden and nursery, and planting new growth,” he said.

“I also like knowing we’re helping feed the community.”

Recycled materials sourced from the community landfill were utilised during the construction of the Beswick Nursery, including discarded fridges that have been transformed from eyesores into novel pots adorned with hand-painted art, and unwanted bed frames that now act as trellises for succulent tomatoes.

WUGULARR WELCOME: It is impossible to miss the entrance to the Beswick Nursery after CDP participants added a splash of colour with painted scraps of corrugated iron.

It is impossible to miss the entrance to the Beswick Nursery after CDP participants added a splash of colour with painted scraps of corrugated iron.

The Council’s CDP Regional Manager, Janelle Iszlaub, explained that the keys to offering a well-supported project were community engagement and skill development.

“With the CDP program, it’s incorporated with work-for-the-dole, so we have to find activities on community that benefit the community,” she said.

“So, with this, we’re having a wonderful turnout, because it’s an activity that’s involving the whole community.

“It’s giving skills to the jobseekers, and it’s involving all the jobseekers.”

Chief Executive Officer Michael Berto congratulated staff and participants for developing a project that delivered a genuine benefit to Beswick, adding that he believed it proved the Council was leading the way with CDP innovation.

“What we’ve got here is something that’s making so much difference to people in Beswick,” he said.

“Not only is it creating engagement and skills participants didn’t have before the nursery opened, it’s also creating a sustainable, local and cost-effective way for community members to access fresh produce.

“These type of exciting projects show Council is breaking the stereotypical mould of work-for-the-dole programs by offering a way for participants to really learn new skills as they try to find employment.”

The Council delivers CDP projects in 10 communities on behalf of the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet.

The Federal Government initiative assists jobseekers in remote communities to find employment as they contribute to their communities and gain new skills in the process.

View the full Media Release here.

FLOURISHING FRIDGES: CDP participant Ray Ashley explains to Director of Commercial Services Marc Gardner and CDP Regional Manager Janelle Iszlaub how fridges recovered from the Beswick landfill are helping the community’s nursery flourish.

CDP participant Ray Ashley explains to Director of Commercial Services Marc Gardner and CDP Regional Manager Janelle Iszlaub how fridges recovered from the Beswick landfill are helping the community’s nursery flourish.