August edition of the newsletter is now available

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Roper Gulf Regional Council Newsletter August 2017-page-001In the August edition of the Roper Gulf Regional Council newsletter:

– Staff showcase Council careers at Katherine expo

– Eight fresh faces for incoming Council

– Learning life stories helps Aged Care staff achieve best practice

– Communities speak up on Strategic Plan

– Numbulwar rolls out festival red carpet

– Online training platform offers development opportunities

Read the August newsletter here.

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Media Release: Ngukurr students saddle up to celebrate equine infrastructure unveiling

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EQUINE EXCELLENCE: Students, CDP participants and staff celebrate the official opening of the Ngukurr School equestrian yards on September 7 after a collaboration between the school and Roper Gulf Regional Council delivered the much-needed infrastructure.

EQUINE EXCELLENCE: Students, Community Development Program participants and staff celebrate the official opening of the Ngukurr School equestrian yards on September 7 after a collaboration between the school and Roper Gulf Regional Council delivered the much-needed infrastructure.

After stepping out of the saddle at the completion of their education, a group of men in Ngukurr have gone back to school to ensure future generations of students in the remote community have access to the infrastructure needed to advance their horsemanship skills.

Through its Community Development Program (CDP), Roper Gulf Regional Council has partnered with the Ngukurr School to construct a set of steel yards that will used by the 16 Year 9 to Year 12 students who learn about riding and equine management when they are not in the classroom.

The school supplied the materials for the ambitious build, with CDP participants providing the labour as they developed a new range of skills in metalwork, construction and project management under the watchful eye of the Council’s CDP Builder Trainer.

Witnessing the yards take shape had special meaning for several of the participants involved in the project who have a first-hand understanding of how important the horsemanship program is for fostering confidence and self-esteem in students.

Roper Gulf Regional Council CDP participant Donald Hall tells CDP Regional Manager Janelle Iszlaub what helping to build the yards means to him as a former student of the Ngukurr School horsemanship program.

Roper Gulf Regional Council CDP participant Donald Hall tells CDP Regional Manager Janelle Iszlaub what helping to build the yards means to him as a former student of the Ngukurr School horsemanship program.

Participant Donald Hall explained that as a former student in the program, he had jumped at the chance to give something back to the school.

“It makes me feel proud to have been in the horse program when I was at school, and now doing something to help the horse program,” he said.

CDP Regional Manager Janelle Iszlaub said she was thrilled to see how committed participants had been to growing their skillsets as part of a project.

“Council has had anywhere from 12 to 20 CDP participants at a time working on this project, and they have put countless hours into finishing it and making sure it is something Ngukurr can be extremely proud of,” she said.

After putting the finishing touches on the fabrication project, CDP participants watch Ngukurr School students try out their new horse yards.

After putting the finishing touches on the fabrication project, CDP participants watch Ngukurr School students try out their new horse yards.

“This was about showing the kids what the participants can do, which has been community involvement and teamwork, welding, machine operation, and preparing and managing the job from initial conception.”

The Council runs CDP projects in its Local Government Area on behalf of the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet.

The Federal Government initiative assists jobseekers in remote communities to find  employment as they contribute to their communities and gain new skills in the process.

View the full Media Release here.

New Council revealed as NTEC declares election result

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ELECTION OUTCOME: Candidates, Roper Gulf Regional Council staff and Member for Arnhem Selena Uibo listen to the Northern Territory Electoral Commission advise which 13 people will represent the region for the next four years following the August 26 NT Local Government election.

ELECTION OUTCOME: Candidates, Roper Gulf Regional Council Executive staff and Member for Arnhem Selena Uibo listen to the Northern Territory Electoral Commission advise which 13 people will represent the region for the next four years following the August 26 NT Local Government election.

Eight new faces will help direct the growth of Roper Gulf Regional Council for the next four years after the Northern Territory Electoral Commission declared the result of the 2017 NT Local Government election on September 4.

NTEC representatives officially advised which 13 candidates had been voted in as Elected Members during a ceremony at the Council’s Katherine headquarters on Monday afternoon, with five incumbents successful in being re-elected for another term of Government.

The Elected Members are:

Never Never Ward – Judy MacFarlane, Annabelle Daylight and Ossie Daylight
Numbulwar Numburindi Ward – Edwin Nunggumajbarr and David Murrungun
Nyirranggulung Ward – Helen Lee, Selina Ashley and Wayne Runyu
South West Gulf Ward – Samuel Evans, Don Garner and Keith Rory
Yugul Mangi Ward – Eric Yelawarra Roberts and Owen Turner

A Mayor and Deputy Mayor will be chosen from within the group when the first Ordinary Meeting of Council is held on September 14.

Chief Executive Officer Michael Berto congratulated the incoming Elected Members and said the senior leadership team was looking forward to a continuation of the strong collaboration that would allow the Council to deliver a sustainable, viable and vibrant Roper Gulf region for residents and ratepayers.

“Our new Council is a strong mix of old and new faces who have committed to being the voice of their respective communities and Wards until 2021,” he said.

“I congratulate all 13 Councillors on their election success, and believe they will provide experience and insight that will assist Council in achieving its strategic goals.”

To view the full results from the 2017 NT Council election, click here.

Media Release: Remote Aged Care staff achieve best practice through life story learning

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LIFE LESSONS: Roper Gulf Regional Council Aged Care staff Helen Sambo, Kaylene Wurramarrba and Ernie Andrews talk to Ngukurr client Helen Harrison about her life in a service delivery move that has garnered national attention in the Aged Care sector.

LIFE LESSONS: Roper Gulf Regional Council Aged Care staff Helen Sambo, Kaylene Wurramarrba and Ernie Andrews talk to Ngukurr client Helen Harrison about her life in a service delivery move that has garnered national attention in the Aged Care sector.

In the strictly-regulated environment of Aged Care, taking the time to discover the lives clients led before requiring assistance often takes a back seat to ensuring the support provided complies with legislative requirements.

But putting a focus on learning about and recording the stories of clients in its remote Aged Care facilities is providing Roper Gulf Regional Council with best-practice results that are being recognised at a national level.

The Council delivers Aged Care services in seven remote Indigenous communities scattered across its 186,000 square kilometre Local Government Area, meaning the tyranny of distance is often assumed to be the biggest challenge for both staff and clients.

While isolation can play a part in the success or failure of service delivery, Community Services Regional Manager Annalisa Bowden explained that the simple act of getting to know clients was allowing the Council to overcome the hurdle of remoteness.

“The biggest challenge we face is not distance or isolation, it’s about failing to recognise the lives our clients lived in their younger years,” she said.

“Aged Care is not just providing a service, it’s about listening to their story – it goes beyond quality care.”

As part of the unique approach, staff are documenting every client’s story to provide key information about what they did in their working life, their family, and the cultural role they played and continue to play in their community.

Ngukurr Acting Aged Care Coordinator Kaylene Wurramarrba and Community Development Program participant Dianne Thompson prepare to deliver meals to clients as part of Roper Gulf Regional Council’s innovative approach to remote Aged Care.

Ngukurr Acting Aged Care Coordinator Kaylene Wurramarrba and Community Development Program participant Dianne Thompson prepare to deliver meals to clients as part of the Council’s innovative approach to remote Aged Care.

After the Council passed a triennial Department of Health quality review following changes to service delivery requirements in the sector, Mrs Bowden and her team were invited to talk about their success at the Australian Aged Care Quality Agency’s Better Practice 2017 conference in Darwin in May.

On the back of this, Mrs Bowden then travelled to Canberra in June as part of a group that met with Federal Minister for Aged Care Ken Wyatt to discuss the changes and how the Council had tailored its service delivery model.

Mrs Bowden said the model facilitated a closer connection with clients, in addition to creating training and employment opportunities for local Indigenous staff.

“Our dedicated staff are building relationships, inspiring social change, empowering people and ultimately challenging the status quo when it comes to Aged Care,” she said.

“The client’s story is the most important thing you can provide your staff, and I think the positive outcomes Council has recorded recently prove this.”

Ngukurr-based Acting Aged Care Coordinator Kaylene Wurramarrba, who oversees the delivery of the program in the remote community, agreed with Mrs Bowden’s assessment.

“We have to get to know these old people to care for them well,” she said.

“To me and to staff, it is good to get these histories so they can still be somebody.

“It’s about respect and letting them know we won’t forget about them just because they are old now.”

View the full Media Release here.